Tag Archives: weight

time for change

We have a new service! Personal Health Coaching!

New Program at Restorative Nutrition!

Are you serious about making changes to your diet and lifestyle? Need more support? This is for you!

Weekly Personal Health Coaching:

After piloting several different methods, we have found that (not surprisingly) people tend to be more successful with their health goals the more contact they have.

Restorative Nutrition is now offering an option for more support and attention to help you meet you health, nutrition, and wellness goals!

How it works:

Part 1: The new program consists of meeting once a month for 45 to 60 minutes in person (this is typically billed through insurance)

Part 2: You will have scheduled weekly telephonic or in person sessions (each 15 minutes) with unlimited texting/emailing support.

Pricing:

While the monthly visits are typically covered by health insurance, the weekly telephonic and face in person appointments would be out of pocket. The pricing is broken down below.

 $140 for initial session and follow up visits (billed through insurance if covered)

  • Weekly follow up options: (Select one)

  • $25 for 15 minute weekly telephonic sessions including unlimited texting/emailing ($75/month)
  • $35 for 15 minute weekly in person sessions including unlimited texting/emailing ($105/month)

*Please note there is an additional fee for any services performed in the home.

Email us today info@restorativenutritionri.com or call 401.529.7925 to set up your appointment and get started on a new healthier lifestyle!

image via harvard school of public health

Your weight does NOT define you!

By: Jill Ouhrabka MS, RD, LDN, CHC

Working with clients, particularly those who are struggle to lose weight there is a common theme…they all are focused on the number on the scale!  Once they let go of weighing themselves they stop focusing on calories and food and end up loosing weight!

Why is this?

When you weigh yourself, you feel good if your weight is where you want it and badly if it is not where you want it. This reaction to the number on the scale can fuel your mood for the day causing negative (or positive) thoughts and emotions particularly related to body image and food choices. You may find yourself restricting calories or food to try to lose weight or making poor food choices because your weight is where you want it. Why does your weight make it okay or not okay to eat certain foods?

By focusing on your weight, you are so focused on changing the number on the scale that you are not actually listening to what your body needs and this can cause many weight issues. You are also not taking into account that your weight can fluctuate a great deal during the day and depending on what is going on with your body.

What is the answer?

If you have to weigh yourself, do it once a week as an objective measure. Don’t let the number define you.  Remember that the number you see on the scale says nothing about your body composition including body fat versus lean muscle. It does not account for height or body frame.

Focus on how you feel in your body. When you are eating well, exercising in moderation, and your clothes fit well, you are going to feel good about your body! When you stop focusing on the number, you can focus on how you feel and what your body needs (as far as food, sleep, nutrition, exercise, meditation, etc).

How can you get to a healthy weight?

Focus on balance. Eating foods that are healthy most of the time, and those less healthy foods in moderation- don’t deny yourself, eat less.

Diet: Focus on eating breakfast everyday and then eating every 3 hours.

Exercise: Aim to exercise most days of the week for 30 to 45 minutes/day.

Sleep:  Get enough sleep! If you are tired, your body will think it needs energy and you will end up eating more!

Stress: Manage stress with exercise, meditation, and yoga. Stress can cause weight gain so managing it daily is essential.

Catherine A

Simple Roasted Carrots

Restorative Nutrition is happy to promote Catherine Amoriggi and her creative recipes. Catherine has a deep love of cooking and passion for creating new recipes. We will be featuring some of her recipes and you can get more ideas at her blog: http://www.cookingwithcath.com/

Simple Roasted Carrots

By: Catherine Amoriggi

Is that a rainbow?? Nope, it’s only carrots! Only carrots? Carrots are a great source of vitamin A and antioxidants so unleash the power of beautiful skin while eating something simply delicious.

This is a really great simple side dish that would go great with any main course (particularly a nice roasted meat or a hearty pasta). Carrots are a refrigerator essential. They have a good shelf life and are relatively inexpensive. Sometimes carrots get a bad rap for not being the most flavorful vegetable, but I simply adore them. When you roast carrots, they take on a very sweet, caramelized flavor. I roasted different colored carrots for this dish. This is the perfect side dish because although the carrots would be great served hot, you can also enjoy them at room temperature or cold. So lets get cooking!

Ingredients:

1 bunch of purple carrots
5 medium sized orange carrots
3 tbs. olive oil
2 whole garlic cloves, still in the  peel
sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper
crushed red flakes
1/2-1 tbs. balsamic glaze
1/2 tbs. roughly chopped fresh parsley

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Wash, trim and peel all of the carrots. Cut the carrots into similar sized matchsticks. Do this by cutting the carrots in half width wise and then half length wise (or so forth).
  3. Toss the carrots in a roasting pan with the olive oil, garlic cloves, salt, black pepper and red pepper. Make sure that the carrots are spread out in one layer.
  4. Place the pan with the carrots in the oven.  Roast for about 8-15 minutes or until the carrots are tender yet brown and caramelized. Take the pan out of the oven.
  5. Top the carrots with the parsley, balsamic glaze and salt and pepper to taste. Put into a serving dish and enjoy!
overeating

Are you starving or tend to overeat when you get home from work?

By:Jillian Ouhrabka MS, RD, LDN, CHC

So many of my clients tell me they eat well all day and then they get home and they can’t stop eating. Does this sound like you? If you are like so many of us, eating lunch and then have nothing to eat until you get home from work-listen up!

The recommendation is to eat every 3 hours to keep sugar cravings away and help you eat less. So think about this….if you eat lunch at noon and nothing until after work you are going about 5 or 6 (or more) hours without eating. This is too long! Now your body/brain is so hungry that it wants to eat anything it can and it doesn’t want a little piece- it wants the whole cake…meaning you will have little to no willpower to make a healthy choice.  This is when you will be cravings sweets, and treats, and be more likely to eat the leftover pie than the leftover salad and you are more likely to overeat and consume excess calories.

How can you stay in control of your eating and cravings?

  • Aim to eat every 3 hours during the day, this means having a morning and afternoon snack
  • Plan to have your afternoon snack (between lunch and dinner) around 3pm
  • Drink water throughout the day to stay hydrated

What should you eat for a snack?

Ideally you want to eat something with protein and carbohydrates to help you feel fuller longer, give you energy and prevent sugar cravings. (Note: If push comes to shove, eating something with just protein or just carbohydrates is fine!)

What are some good afternoon snacks?  (Tip: Bring snacks to work and have on hand in your office for emergency hunger situations!)

  • String cheese and an apple or orange
  • Fat free Greek Yogurt with ½ cup high fiber cereal mixed in
  • 1/2 cup cereal with skim milk
  • A banana or piece of fruit with 1 Tbsp. peanut butter (slice the banana lengthwise, add the peanut butter and put it back together and eat it as you would a normal banana)
  • Save half your sandwich from lunch and eat it at 3pm
  • Share a bag of popcorn with a coworker (don’t add butter or salt to it)
  • Hummus with celery or carrot sticks
  • ½ cup low fat cottage cheese with sliced apple or on a piece of whole wheat toast (or crackers)

healthy snack

What else can I do to minimize overeating when I get home?

  • Keep some granola bars, nuts, cereal, or fruit in your car (I recommend keeping granola bars in your trunk and grabbing 1 as you get in the car).  When you leave work, eat the snack as you drive home.  This way, by the time you get home you will not be quite as hungry and can either wait for dinner or will be more apt to make a healthy option
  • Plan ahead: If you like to eat right when you get home, keep fruit salad, vegetable salad, or healthy leftovers in the refrigerator and PLAN to eat it when you get home.
  • Put it on a plate: Never stand in front of a cabinet or the refrigerator or eat directly out of a package/bag…always put your food on a plate, in a dish, or bowl and sit down to eat it!
  • Drink a glass of water when you get home-this will help fill you up so you are not as likely to overeat.  Often times we are actually thirsty when we think we are hungry-drinking water first will help you determine if you were thirsty or if you are hungry and can save you calories!

Late night snacking

If you find you are snacking a lot in the evening, take control and plan to have a snack after dinner. Opt for diet hot chocolate, a bowl of high fiber cereal with skim milk, a bag of popcorn, or Greek yogurt.

Tip: Try fat free plain Greek yogurt, mix in 1 to 2 Tbsp. sugar free pudding (try cheesecake, chocolate, or French vanilla) and enjoy a guilt free high protein, low fat, low calorie dessert!

For more tips on how to help maintain a healthy weight email us at info@restorativenutritionri.com or visit us at www.restorativenutritionri.com.

no diet

Struggling with food or your weight?

Do you struggle to eat well, are the holidays overwhelming you? Is it difficult to maintain a healthy weight? Does work and life seem to get in the way of exercising and eating well?

When was the last time you took time to meet with someone and talk about your lifestyle and how you can be healthier?

As we are in the busiest time of the year it can be difficult to take time for ourselves. What if I told you that if you took an hour to meet with me, to talk about your lifestyle and health goals, that I could help you change your life? I am a Registered Dietitian, Certified Health Coach, and recovered food addict. I understand how challenging it can be to make time for yourself, to focus on your health. I also know how critical it is to take time to do just this.

What do I offer you?

  • A confidential and supportive environment
  • A unique and integrative approach to your health
  • Evidenced based knowledge to help you navigate the path to healthy choices and weight management
  • Personal experience
    • I suffered with food addiction and compulsive eating for 14 years, I know how challenging it can be to change and I also know what it takes to do just that!
    • 24/7 support
    • Flexible scheduling and payment option

There is no one answer, we are all different with different goals, lifestyles, and beliefs. I will help you find the path that will lead you to a healthier, happier you. You are worth it. Don’t wait until the 1st of the year, call or email now: info@restorativenutritionri.com.

getty_rf_photo_of_honey_with_prebiotics

Prebiotics versus Probiotics

If you are like many Americans you are probably hearing more and more about prebiotics and probiotics. Perhaps you are wondering what they are and why you are hearing so much about them. Many food products are claiming to have digestive health properties or offer improved immune function. These products are usually promoting prebiotic or probiotic components.

While not necessarily essential to be healthy, prebiotics and probiotics offer many health promoting benefits. When combined, prebiotics and probiotics form a symbiotic relationship promoting improved immune function and intestinal health.

Although research is still pending, health benefits associated with consuming prebiotics and probiotics include:

  • Protection against certain types of cancers
  • Promotion of healthy urinary tract infection
  • Improved immune system function
  • Better absorption of vitamins and minerals
  • Improved diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal infections resulting from certain medications

*Tip: To help maintain a healthy gut, include a variety of prebiotics and probiotics.

Learn More:

What are probiotics?

Probiotics are beneficial strains of bacterial that help promote digestive health. When our body experiences chronic stress, poor dietary choices, and certain illnesses it can become unbalanced due to a loss of beneficial bacterial. When this happens you may experience severe bloating, gas, and low immunity towards illness and disease. Probiotics help regulate and balance our digestive tract so we can fight infections and maintain optimal health

Where are probiotics found?

Probiotics are found in many fermented foods including:

  • Active cultures found in yogurt
  • Acidophilus milk
  • Miso (fermented soybean paste)
  • Sourdough bread
  • Sauerkraut
  • Kefir (a fermented yogurt type drink)

What are prebiotics?

Simply stated, prebiotics are a non-digestible carbohydrate that fuels/feeds the probiotic microorganisms. Probiotics, or good bacteria, need energy to survive and flourish-this is where prebiotics come in providing the fuel source for probiotics to stay active and healthy.

Eat a variety of prebiotics to promote healthy growth of these good bacteria in your gut!

Where are prebiotics found?

Prebiotics are found in many foods, some common sources include:

  • Bananas
  • Honey
  • Legumes
  • Whole grains (oats, rye, wheat, barley)
  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Asparagus

*Tip: To help you remember the difference, think of probiotics as healthy bacteria and prebiotics as the food they eat or think “prebiotics fuel probiotics.”

For more information email info@restorativenutritionri.com.