Tag Archives: weight struggle

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To help you get the most out of your calories and food try these foods!

I struggle to feel full during the day. To help curb my appetite I always make sure to have some carbs and protein.  This combination helps slow down the absorption of food so I feel fuller longer and am less likely to snack between meals.

My “go-to” food is Greek yogurt or 1/2 cup low fat cottage cheese (both packed with protein) with 1/2 cup high fiber cereal mixed in.  It is very satisfying! Try these other foods to help fill you up for less calories:

  • Eggs (about 70 calories each) : Eggs are packed with high quality protein and healthy fat to help you feel full so you eat less
    • Greek Yogurt (about 100- 140calories each): Greek yogurt is high in protein, low in fat and added sugar and is a great mid-morning snack ii. To make it healthier get 0% fat plain Greek yogurt and add your own fruit
    • Go for Dark Chocolate (about 160 calories per 1 ounce):We all need something sweet now and again. Dark chocolate helps slow digestion to help you feel fuller longer and generally 1 piece (about 1 ounce) is satisfying so you won’t overdo on calories
    • Cottage cheese (about 80 calories per serving). Opt for low fat and fat free to help you feel full and get some additional protein and calcium
    • Skim Milk (about 80 calories per 8oz serving) i. Skim milk will help you meet your calcium and protein needs without the fat and calories of whole milk
    • Fruits and Veggies: Choose fruits and veggies that have the peel/skin intact. This is where the fiber is, you need the fiber to help you feel full (and fiber helps you manage a healthy weight). Fruits and veggies are also a lower calorie food so you can enjoy it without feeling any guilt!

Remember to eat every 3 hours to curb sugar cravings!

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Jeff’s Healthy Philly Cheesesteak Sub

by: Jill Ouhrabka MS,RD, LDN, CHC

You can still eat the foods you love, just make a few changes and enjoy a healthier option!

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 4, 8” Whole Wheat Sub Rolls (1 sub per person)
  • 8 slices of 2% American Cheese slices (2 slices per person)
  • 16 oz deli sliced Lean Roast Beef  (Tip: opt for low sodium to decrease sodium content) (4 oz. per person)
  • Pepper,  Garlic Powder,  Onion Powder
  • Optional : 1 cup each of Onion, Pepper and Mushrooms

Directions:

  • Sauté the onion, pepper, and mushroom into a pan (use non-stick vegetable oil and/or a little oil in the pan)
  • Add the roast beef and spices
  • Toast the sub roll
  • Add the slices of cheese to the sub roll and allow to slightly melt (note: you can also cheese to the stir fry pan if you prefer
  • Place stir fried meat and veggies on cheese on sub roll
  • Enjoy!

How does this recipe compare to traditional recipes?

Jeff’s Homemade Philly Cheesesteak Sub vs. Traditional Philly Cheesesteak Sub:

The winner is…Homemade!!!

Traditional Philly Cheesesteak

Homemade Philly Cheesesteak

The Difference

The Healthier Option is:

Total Calories

710 Calories

420 Calories

290 Calories

Homemade

Total Calories from Fat

214 Calories

90 Calories

24 Calories

Homemade

Total Fat

24 grams

10 grams

24 grams

Homemade

Total Cholesterol

113 mg

100 mg

13 mg

Homemade

Total Sodium

1743 mg

1410 mg

333 mg

Homemade

Total Carbohydrates

72 grams

42 grams

30 grams

Homemade

Total Protein

49 grams

41 grams

8 grams

Traditional

Total Sugar

6 grams

3 grams

3 grams

Homemade

Total Fiber

6 grams

9 grams

3 grams

Homemade

quinoa

Quinoa and Bean Salad

Makes 4 to 6 servings for a main course or 8 as a side dish

Ingredients

  • 1 ½  cups quinoa
  • 1 ½  cups cooked black beans
  • 1 ½ cups cooked kidney beans
    • Tip: If you buy canned beans always rinse them so cut down on the sodium content
  • 1 ½  tablespoons red-wine vinegar
  • 1 ½  cups cooked corn
  • 1 ripe avocado diced
  • Tip: Use fresh corn in the summer, or frozen in the winter, again if you use canned rinse it before cooking
  • 1 ½ cups diced tomatoes
  • ¾ cup finely chopped green bell pepper
  • ¾ cup diced banana peppers
  • ¼  cup finely chopped coriander
  • 5 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
    • Tip: If you are watching your sodium intake, use salt substitute
  • 1 ¼  teaspoons ground cumin, or to taste
  • 1/3 cup olive oil

Making the Dish:

  1. Clean and prep quinoa as indicated on box or bag: Typically you will need to wash the quinoa under water until the water is clear
  2. In a large saucepan bring water to boiling, then add quinoa and cook for about 10 minutes
  3. While the quinoa is cooking, start another saucepan with about 3 cups of water for step 5
  4. Drain quinoa and rinse under cold water
  5. Next, using a sieve you will put the quinoa over a saucepan with boiling water, cover the quinoa with a towel and lid
    1. The object here is to steam the quinoa so you don’t want it touching the boiling water
    2. Steam until it appears light and fluffy (usually about 8 to 10 minutes)
    3. Once light and fluffy, put quinoa into a large bowl and let it cool (stir it occasionally to help cool faster)
  6. Mix the beans, vinegar, salt and pepper in a small bowl
  7. Once the quinoa is cool, add the bean mix from step 6, the bell pepper, banana pepper, coriander, avocado, tomatoes and corn
  8. Make the dressing: Combine the lime juice, salt, and cumin ina small bowl.  As you whisk these ingredients together, add the oil and continue whisking. Once combined, add to the quinoa salad.
  9. Serve salad at room temperature and enjoy!

     

     

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Dietitian vs. Nutritionist

By Jillian Ouhrabka, MS, RD, LDN, CHC

Very often I am asked what is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist. The answer is…a lot!

 

Registered Dietitian

Nutritionist

4 year Bachelor Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics

Yes

No

1200 hours supervised practice

Yes

No

Certification Exam accredited by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Yes

No

Covered by Health Insurance

Yes

No

The big picture:

Dietitians: Dietitians are held to a higher standard and go through a great deal of training.

  • All qualified dietitians have to meet national standards and statewide standards including passing a credentialing examination, fulfilling continuing education requirements, filing for state and national accreditation
  • Dietitians are covered by health insurance, nutritionists are not

Nutritionists: Anyone can claim to be a nutritionist, you don’t know what their training is.

  • Nutritionist is a non- accredited title that anyone can claim. This title can be used by anyone and is not protected-essentially you do not know what nutrition background this person actually has
  • Nutritionists do not have any professional practical training, are not registered, licensed, or held accountable for their practice

The bottom line: For any nutrition advice, you want to get sound, evidence based information. You can get this information if you seek the help of a qualified dietitian.

Tips: Look for an RD (Registered Dietitian) credential after the person’s name. This means they are Registered with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In Rhode Island a dietitian must also be licensed so look for an LDN (Licensed Dietitian/Nutritionist).

 

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Food Addiction Journal Entry

Note: “This is a journal entry when I was at a pivotal point in changing my eating habits and behaviors. Journaling has really helped me learn why I binged, and struggled with food. I encourage you to start journaling and trying to understand why you are struggling to maintain a healthy weight or struggle with food. My hope is that by sharing these types of entries, you will realize you are not alone with your food addiction or weight struggles. I struggled for 16 years. You can get better, there is hope. Do not give up!!” ~Jill

April 19, 2010

To most people a cookie represents happiness. It is something sweet that they crave and eating it fulfills the craving which then passes. To me, a cookie represents fat, calories, and “being bad.” If I ate a cookie I would be “misbehaving.” This does not apply simply to cookies but also to pancakes, cake, pastry, candy, butter, lard, oil, essentially anything with fat and sugar. I realize as I write this how most people will roll their eyes and say “get over it” or “just eat it!” but I also realize that these people would have no comprehension of what it is like to be physically afraid of food.

More and more I am really getting the whole idea that food is what we need for energy.  This simple statement seems like a no brainer but if it was so simple to just eat for energy there would not be such an epidemic of obesity or a rising number of eating disorders and food addiction. I am continually trying to train myself to eat and think more in terms of refueling my body. I am thinking of my body as a car, it won’t work if it doesn’t have fuel. For instance, if I go for a run I will think of the energy I just used and realize that I need to “refuel” in order to continue to operate. I am thinking of my body in much nicer terms. I would not be able to live if it did not support me. I must support it with healthy foods and give it enough food. I am trying to appreciate myself much more.

In many ways I really love and admire my body. I find it amazing that my body can operate on its own and it will keep me alive as long as I provide it with the tools it needs.  While high fat/ high sugar foods are what taste great, they are not the best choice for providing the body with the energy and nutrition it needs to survive. The best choices are low fat, nutrient dense foods like brown rice, vegetables, lean meats/fish/protein, and dairy products.

My whole life I have looked at my body as a means of acceptance to others.  It was like a competition, everyone needed to be the same small pant size or something was wrong with you. I have thought that if my body could look a certain way then I will be more loved by my family and more accepted by strangers and the general population. I remember when I lost weight in high school and college- I loved when people would compliment me on my figure-it made me feel “better than the rest.” Now I realize that this method of thinking is absurd. The reality is that being a certain size is not what is important but rather what you are physically putting into your body (or not putting into it) that is important.

My goal going forward is to eat for health, not happiness/comfort/guilt/etc. I want to become one of those people who changes their whole life simply by eating better and exercising. My biggest challenge is eating right. I keep eating two and three hundred calorie meals and then snacking a lot because I am still so hungry. While I almost never go over my calorie allotment, I also never really feel full. This is something I would like to work on as well.

I really wish this was not such a struggle for me. I wish I could just eat whatever I want and not care but I can’t…not yet.